Christ Has Risen

He has risen indeed!

The other day we drove past a local church with a banner that read:

Easter is for Everyone!
(No religious experience necessary)

We chuckled, paused, reflected… It’s accurate, but does it feel like an odd thing to say? I’m still thinking about it, so at least that makes it effective advertising…

Easter is for everyone. John 3:16 affirms that God loves the whole world so much that He sent His one and only Son to live and die and rise from the dead to bring us back into right relationship with our Creator. Jesus didn’t sacrifice Himself only for those with religious experience, but for the whole world.

Jesus came to redeem our lives from sin and death. To restore our relationship with the God who loves us. To give our lives meaning and purpose. To reconcile us with one another and with this great big beautiful Planet Earth.

Even those of us with religious experience forget the vast significance of what Jesus did for us. We need regular reminders.

Today Tween and I will teach the 4-year-olds that God sent Jesus to be our forever friend. Because John 3:16. Yesterday I saw our co-teacher and admitted that I hadn’t read the lesson yet. But really, what we want these precious littles to know is that God is good and that God loves them. This sweet man exclaimed, “That’s what I need to know, too!”

Yes. God is good. God loves us. Love God, and love one another. It’s that simple.

But not easy. Even the disciples struggled. Jesus died and He rose. They saw Him in His resurrected body, and they still didn’t know what to do next. So they went back to what they knew. The former fishermen went fishing.

They failed at this thing they’d been doing all their lives. Enter Jesus. Jesus redeemed their failed experience beyond imagination. He restored their discouraged hearts. He reclaimed their vision for what He wanted to do in and through them. Jesus loved them fully and graciously. No judgment, no condemnation, only love and direction for the future.

Thank you, Jesus!

Resurrection Sunday 2017
John 21:1-17

Connect
In which ‘regular’ activities do you engage to distract yourself from discouragement?

Study
Read aloud John 21:1-14.
How did “the disciple whom Jesus loved” recognize Jesus (vv. 4-7)?
Imagine you are Peter. Why did you get dressed and jump in the water (v. 7)?
Why do you think Jesus helped the disciples catch fish (v. 6) and asked for some of the fish they caught (v. 10) when He already had fish (v. 9)? What might that tell us about Jesus? About us?
How do you understand the disciples’ reaction to Jesus in v. 12?
Read aloud John 21:15-17.
Why does Jesus connect loving Him with feeding and caring for His sheep?

Live
How do you recognize Jesus when He shows up in your life?
Where in your life do you need Jesus to show up with His miraculous power?
Jesus helped discouraged fisherman haul in a noteworthy catch, and He also called Peter back to his true calling as a disciple. How might Jesus want to redeem and transform your life?
Do you truly love Jesus? How do you show it?
What is Jesus saying to you through this study, and how will you respond?

Pray
Pray for God to do more than you can ask or imagine in and through your life.

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For Cryin’ Out Loud

How many times have I sat with a group of women, Bibles open to Luke 10, as criticism of Martha zings around the room?

Martha’s too busy.
She’s caught up in the wrong thing.
She’s obviously Type A.
Clearly she’s a fussbudget busybody.
She’s overly dramatic.
She’s causing a scene.
Does she think she needs to prepare six courses? Hasn’t she heard of a one-pot meal? How about a sheet pan dinner?

Poor Martha! Every once in a while a woman seated around the circle will eke out a timid comment in her defense: who among us hasn’t acted like Martha at least once? Who truly feels qualified to cast these stones?

Mary gets the honor, while Martha gets vilified. I think we might be missing the point.

I think Martha lost sight of Jesus.

Martha welcomed Jesus into her home. She made Him and His traveling entourage feel comfortable. Hospitality was a BIG big deal back then, way more so than these days. Dirt floors and mud walls might have made housecleaning less of an obvious burden (or moreso?), but inviting at least thirteen hungry travelers into your home meant you probably had to slaughter a goat or two. To skin it, clean it, cook it, how long would that take? (asks the vegetarian…) Plus the side dishes: I imagine tabbouleh and unleavened bread, eggs and nuts and fruit, cheese and wine.spice-370114_1920

I’m getting better, but I used to turn into a whirling dervish before hosting a dinner party. Except way less graceful. I have a soft spot for Martha.

No, I don’t think it’s Martha’s hospitality that got her in trouble. She worked that gift in spades (go, girl!). The key is in her question. Interrupting the party beyond the kitchen, Martha cried:

“Master, don’t you care…?”

Martha forgot who Jesus was. If God = love and Jesus = God, then Jesus = love. Okay, I’m willing to concede that maybe Martha didn’t know Jesus well enough yet. Maybe the if/then hadn’t been made clear.

And yet: I believe Mary’s stillness at Jesus’ feet and Martha’s busyness in the kitchen were separated by only one thing. Mary was attentive to Jesus and Martha was attentive to her preparations.

Can we do whatever we’re doing and still be attentive to Jesus? I sure hope so! I’ve pretty much built my life and faith on paying attention to God while I also do business. In Out of Sorts, Sarah Bessey claims that real, undignified life is the classroom for holiness. “If you can’t find God while you’re changing diapers or serving food or hanging out with your friends, you won’t find God at the worship service or the spiritual retreat or the regimented daily quiet time or the mission field” (p117).

If Martha had taken off her apron and plunked herself down next to Mary, she still might have missed Jesus. She needed to focus her heart, not her hands.

Martha’s cry recalled for me Mark 4, the disciples in the boat when the storm came up. Jesus was sleeping, which might have been a good tip off that God was not going to sink them. But their fisherman training got the best of them. They’d seen storms and this one seemed bad in the worst way.rembrandt_christ_in_the_storm_on_the_lake_of_galilee

They cried: “Teacher, don’t you care…?”

Of course He does. Jesus loved them. Jesus loves us.

Jesus loves us in the boat. In the kitchen. In the green pastures and the dark valleys, wherever He leads us He also loves us. Psalm 31:7 promises, “I will be glad and rejoice in your unfailing love, for you have seen my troubles, and you care…”

Thinking about Martha’s cry, the disciples’ cry, brought to mind the phrase, “for cryin’ out loud.” I did an online search and each site that popped up confirmed the same origin for the phrase. While consistently an expression of frustration or exasperation, its origin comes from the phrase, “for Christ’s sake.”

Which made me laugh: crying out to Christ, in frustration and fear, for Christ’s sake? That seems appropriate. We call out to Christ–maybe with the wrong motives, sure, but still–we cry out to Him and He draws us near for His own sake. Because He loves us.

On the Go

To my senior quote in my high school yearbook I included Matthew 28:20–“And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.” With life as I knew it coming to an end and a future on the horizon I could barely imagine, I relished the comfort that Jesus would always be with me. No matter what happened, no matter the highs or lows of circumstance, I would never be alone.

Fast forward six years to flowers from a friend on the occasion of my being hired for my first paid ministry gig. The card read: “Go and make disciples!” I had prayed so long and hard for this professional opportunity that her words, well-chosen from Matthew 28:19, felt like confirmation: my always-present God would be with me as I shared the good news of His great love with others.

Fast forward another four or so years: Guy and I were married, both working at the same church, both attending seminary part-time. We were also pregnant. During the last months of pregnancy, we were enrolled in a Leadership class. [Funny side note: I wrote the end notes for my final paper while in labor. Sadly but not surprisingly, I had to rewrite them after Teen was born].

Professor wrote a note on that final paper, wondering why I hadn’t reflected more on parenting as leadership. He had taught about it but, as much as that baby-in-belly animated my body and imagination, I couldn’t yet wrap my brain around how much leadership goes into the significant and mundane acts of parenting.hands-1920854_1920

Eighteen years later, I’d like to hit Rewind rather than Fast Forward. While some days felt oh-so-loooong, and I am generally grateful to be done with certain seasons, overall this parenting gig might have been on Fast Forward x4. Now Teen is a high school senior, actively preparing for his own can’t-even-imagine-it future.

As I listened to this morning’s sermon on Matthew 28:16-20, as I pondered the distinction between making Christian converts and making disciples of Christ, I recalled that Leadership class. As a parent, I wasn’t aiming at my kids’ one-time decisions; I hope, instead, that I modeled, taught, and led them into a lifestyle of putting God first; loving Jesus with all my heart, soul, and strength; asking not just what I want but what God wants for me, for us.

So much of parenting happens on the go: in the car, between activities, running errands. Jesus knew that, of course, which is why “Go and make disciples” might be translated, “As you are going, make disciples.” Which means I should always be prepared to give a good and gentle answer to anyone who asks about my faith. To anyone, but especially my children.

As we are going to school. As we are walking the dog. As we are carpooling. As we are on the sidelines at the game. As we are doing homework. As we are making and eating dinner. As we are doing chores. As we are going to church, yes, but in all life’s other moments as well.

I never intended to raise young Christian converts, products of a one-time decision. Instead, I intended to make disciples, young men whose decisions over time will show that they have become life-long followers of Jesus Christ.

Come & See – Matthew 28:16-20

Connect
Reflect on a significant lesson you learned from a teacher/mentor. What makes that lesson stand out?

Study
Read Matthew 28:16-20.
Why do you think Matthew tells us that some worshiped Jesus while others doubted (v. 17)?
Why does it matter that Jesus has authority in heaven and earth (v. 18)?
According to vv. 19-20, what does it mean to “make disciples”?
Why does Jesus reassure His disciples of His ongoing presence with them (v. 20)?

Live
Who was instrumental in your growth as a disciple?
How have you discipled others?
What is the difference between making Christian converts and making disciples of Christ?
What might help those who doubt take steps toward Jesus? What could get in their way?
In an average week, who might you meet in the places you go that God might want you to disciple? What could that look like?
What does this passage communicate about what it means to be Jesus’ disciple?
What is Jesus saying to you through this study, and how will you respond?

Pray
Pray that God will direct you to people and opportunities to share His love.